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Buy Dollars With Euros


As the Fed raises interest rates, the rates on interest-bearing investments tend to rise as well. If the Fed raises rates more than the European Central Bank, higher interest returns will attract investor money from euros into dollar-denominated investments. Those investors will have to sell euros and buy dollars to buy those holdings. That drives the euro down and the dollar up.




buy dollars with euros



A weaker euro can be a headache for the European Central Bank because it can mean higher prices for imported goods, particularly oil, which is priced in dollars. The ECB is already being pulled in different directions: It is raising interest rates, the typical medicine for inflation, but higher rates also can slow economic growth.


In addition to any applicable fees, Wells Fargo makes money when we convert one currency to another currency for you. The exchange rate used when Wells Fargo converts one currency to another is set at our sole discretion, and it includes a markup. The markup is designed to compensate us for several considerations including, without limitation, costs incurred, market risks, and our desired return. The applicable exchange rate does not include, and is separate from, any applicable fees. The exchange rate Wells Fargo provides to you may be different from exchange rates you see elsewhere. Different customers may receive different rates for transactions that are the same or similar, and the applicable exchange rate may be different for foreign currency cash, drafts, checks, or wire transfers. Foreign exchange markets are dynamic and rates fluctuate over time based on market conditions, liquidity, and risks. Wells Fargo is your arms-length counterparty on foreign exchange transactions. We may refuse to process any request for a foreign exchange transaction.


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Fees may depend on where the company you're transacting with is based. There isn't a foreign transaction fee if the purchase is through a third-party U.S. entity like Expedia, but there often is one if booked directly through a foreign entity like the actual hotel, Leocha said.


Resist the urge to buy foreign currency before your trip. Some tourists feel like they just have to have euros or British pounds in their pockets when they step off the airplane, but they pay the price in bad stateside exchange rates. Wait until you arrive to withdraw money. I've yet to see a European airport that didn't have plenty of ATMs.


Avoid (or at least minimize) cash exchange. In general, I avoid exchanging money in Europe; it's a big rip-off. On average, at a bank you lose about 8 percent when you change dollars to euros or another foreign currency. When you use an airport currency exchange booth such as Forex or Travelex, the hit can be as much as 15 percent.


Likewise, in some non-eurozone countries, the euro is commonly accepted, but usually a bad deal. For example, in Switzerland, which officially uses Swiss francs, some ATMs give euros, prices in touristy areas are listed in both currencies, and travelers can get by with euro cash. But if you pay in euros, you'll get a rotten exchange rate. Ideally, if you're in a non-euro country for more than a few hours, head to the ATM and use local currency instead.


You don't need to constantly consult a currency converter. While you can do real-time conversion with an app, I've never bothered. You just need to know the rough exchange rates. I see no need to have it figured to the third decimal.


Plan your cash withdrawals wisely. Avoid having a lot of unused currency left over when you cross borders between countries that use different currencies. (This should also help you minimize withdrawal fees.)


Consider getting back to dollars at the end of your trip. If you have foreign cash left at the end of your trip, and some time to spare, you can change it into dollars or simply spend it at the airport before you fly home. Although you might get a few more dollars from your hometown bank for that last smattering of foreign bills, to me it feels clean and convenient to simply fly home with nothing but dollars in my pocket.


While debit cards can make decent backup credit cards (provided your card has a Visa or MasterCard logo), credit cards make rotten backup ATM cards because of their sky-high withdrawal fees and cash-advance interest rates. I'd only use a credit card at an ATM as a last resort. (Note that an extra credit card can be helpful if you rent a car and use your card to cover a collision damage waiver).


Exchange rates fluctuate, at times significantly, and you acknowledge and accept all risks that may result from such fluctuations. If we assign an exchange rate to your foreign exchange transaction, that exchange rate will be determined by us in our sole discretion based upon such factors as we determine relevant, including without limitation, market conditions, exchange rates charged by other parties, our desired rate of return, market risk, credit risk and other market, economic and business factors, and is subject to change at any time without notice. You acknowledge that exchange rates for retail and commercial transactions, and for transactions effected after regular business hours and on weekends, are different from the exchange rates for large inter-bank transactions effected during the business day, as may be reported in The Wall Street Journal or elsewhere. Exchange rates offered by other dealers or shown at other sources by us or other dealers (including online sources) may be different from our exchange rates. The exchange rate you are offered may be different from, and likely inferior to, the rate paid by us to acquire the underlying currency.


In connection with our market making and other activities, we may engage in hedging, including pre-hedging, to mitigate our risk, facilitate customer transactions and hedge any associated exposure. Such activities may include trading ahead of order execution. These transactions will be designed to be reasonable in relation to the risks associated with the potential transaction with you. These transactions may affect the price of the underlying currency, and consequently, your cost or proceeds. You acknowledge that we bear no liability for these potential price movements. When our pre-hedging and hedging activity is completed at prices that are superior to the agreed upon execution price or benchmark, we will keep the positive difference as a profit in connection with the transactions. You will have no interest in any profits.


We also may take proprietary positions in certain currencies. You should assume we have an economic incentive to be a counterparty to any transaction with you. Again, you have no interest in any profit associated with this activity and those profits are solely for our account.


We do not accept any liability for our exchange rates. Any and all liability for our exchange rates is disclaimed, including without limitation direct, indirect or consequential loss, and any liability if our exchange rates are different from rates offered or reported by third parties, or offered by us at a different time, at a different location, for a different transaction amount, or involving a different payment media (including but not limited to bank-notes, checks, wire transfers, etc.).


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Russia said last week that it wants the European countries that buy its natural gas to make their payments in rubles, rather than dollars or euros. A month ago, that might have seemed like a pretty good deal: The ruble was down 40%, at 139 rubles to the dollar, in the wake of Russia's invasion of Ukraine.


Add to that the increase in oil and natural gas prices, as well as the resilience of Russia's trading relations with other big economies such as China and India, and the net result is that there is still a steady flow of foreign currency into Russia. This has eased concerns that Russia would become insolvent, and it has helped put a floor under the ruble.


Another hole in the sanctions is worth mentioning here: the sovereign debt carve-out. One of the biggest and most impactful sanctions on Russia was the freezing of its foreign accounts. Russia holds about $640 billion worth of euros, dollars, yen and other foreign currencies in banks around the world. About half that amount is located in the U.S. and Europe. The sanctions blocked Russia's access to that money, except when it comes to making the interest payments on its sovereign debt. The U.S. Treasury left a window open to allow financial intermediaries to process payments for Russia. That window is scheduled to close this month, but it has been a big help to Russia. Without it, Russia might have needed to raise dollars by selling rubles, which would have put downward pressure on the currency. And had it not been able to raise those dollars, it would have defaulted. 041b061a72


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