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The Acoustic Atlas collects the sounds of Montana and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, along with habitats and species from throughout the Western United States. The 3,091 audio files include sounds of amphibians, birds, fish, invertebrates, mammals, reptiles, and ambient recordings. Browse by species, explore a soundscape in our ambient recordings, or learn about the significance of sound through our featured interviews.




Download File Boom.Library.Prairies.Surround.Ed...


DOWNLOAD: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furluso.com%2F2uguL8&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw24JGBphYCuxsDeHqHGNOkr



Media Rights: Audio file copyright Jeff Rice and Montana State University; Use of this audio file is allowed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.


The natural world is ideally suited to spatial audio and surround sound recording. Its soundscapes rarely exist in true stereo, but are heard from all directions and angles. Since 2017, we have been making multichannel ambisonic recordings in environments in Montana and other Western states. We offer a limited number of these recordings for research and personal use. They were recorded in 4-channel B-format and are distributed in Furse-Malham standard (FuMa). These files are available as uncompressed downloads but cannot be republished, rebroadcast or distributed in any form without permission of the media rights holder. If you wish to use these files in other contexts, we encourage you to contact us. We often allow free use of our sound files for noncommercial, educational projects and would love to hear how you might use them.


This account of the Prairie Grove Civil War battle is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file for "Prairie Grove Battlefield" and other primary sources about the battle. It was made possible by the National Park Service's American Battlefield Protection Program. The lesson written by Don Montgomery, Park Historian at Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park, and Lea Flowers Baker, Education Coordinator at the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage. It was edited by Kathleen Hunter, an education consultant working in Hartford, CT and the Teaching with Historic Places staff. TwHP is sponsored, in part, by the Cultural Resources Training Initiative and Parks as Classrooms programs of the National Park Service. This lesson is one in a series that brings the important stories of historic places into the classrooms across the country.


The videos on this page are available for downloading the mp4 file by clicking on the name of the video link below. Select the "I" icon on the right side of player and download by selecting the download icon. We do ask that you give credit to the photographer/videographer or creator and to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in a format similar to the example below: Credit: John Doe, USFWS Some of the video productions contain music that has been licensed to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.


The numbers denote the following areas: (1) irrigation fields, (2) airport, (3) aquifer areas, (4) areas managed by the Regional Water Management Board, and (5) the city center. The shapefiles are provided by Polish Database of Topographic Objects [66] and Wrocław Spatial Information System [69]. The land relief layers were produced using data from EU-DEM [71].


Different colors indicate particular components (groups of patches that are connected) calculated for distance threshold: (a) 20 m, (b) 44 m, and (c) 100 m. For simplicity, the smallest and largest distance thresholds (2 and 1000 m, respectively) are not shown. The shapefiles are provided by Polish Database of Topographic Objects [66] and Wrocław Spatial Information System [69].


The green color shows the 20% of grasslands patches with the highest dIIC values for a dispersal distance of 44 m; the gray indicates the remaining 80% of patches. Notably, the patches with the highest dIIC values are the largest. It is also clear that patches in city center usually had a low value for overall connectivity. The shapefiles are provided by Polish Database of Topographic Objects [66] and Wrocław Spatial Information System [69].


Please submit your revised manuscript by Nov 27 2020 11:59PM. If you will need more time than this to complete your revisions, please reply to this message or contact the journal office at gro.solp@enosolp. When you're ready to submit your revision, log on to and select the 'Submissions Needing Revision' folder to locate your manuscript file.


If you would like to make changes to your financial disclosure, please include your updated statement in your cover letter. Guidelines for resubmitting your figure files are available below the reviewer comments at the end of this letter.


4. We note that Figures in your submission contain map/satellite images which may be copyrighted. All PLOS content is published under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which means that the manuscript, images, and Supporting Information files will be freely available online, and any third party is permitted to access, download, copy, distribute, and use these materials in any way, even commercially, with proper attribution. For these reasons, we cannot publish previously copyrighted maps or satellite images created using proprietary data, such as Google software (Google Maps, Street View, and Earth). For more information, see our copyright guidelines: -and-copyright.


[NOTE: If reviewer comments were submitted as an attachment file, they will be attached to this email and accessible via the submission site. Please log into your account, locate the manuscript record, and check for the action link "View Attachments". If this link does not appear, there are no attachment files.]


These unique recordings have been meticulously collected from each subset of tropical ecosystems in the utmost bio-diverse Central America. It includes rainforests (jungle), cloudforests, dry forests, mangroves, and various other settings (see the file list included).


Documentation is organized into three sections according to the file format returned by each service: JSON, tab-delimited text, and PDF. All web service requests are made using the HTTP GET method. Users can therefore call EDIT web services via URL or other standard means (e.g., AJAX). Detailed examples of using EDIT web services can be found in the tutorial sections of this page.


This service returns a JSON file of ecological dynamics data for the specified ecological class. Data for all description sections can be obtained using the Class Description web service. Web services for individual plant community data elements are also available.


This service returns a tab-delimited file of ecological classes for the specified catalog and geographic unit. The list can be filtered by adding one or more optional query parameter to the service call.


Enter the following URL into a web browser to retrieve data in JSON format for the Thermic Cherty Dolomite Upland Oak-Hickory Forest ecological site of Major Land Resource Area 128X, Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys. The data catalog is specified in the URL by its symbol, "esd", indicating the Ecological Site Descriptions data catalog. # Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.# A JSON file will be downloaded. Geographic data set A geographic data set is a collection of geographic units that can be drawn on a map and together define the geographic extent of a data catalog. All of the geographic units within a geographic data set are typically delineated according to a particular set of rules, governing such attributes as geographic unit size and intended viewing scale. Geographic data sets are typically not referenced in web page URLs or web service calls, since each data catalog is always associated with a single geographic data set.


Enter the following URL into a web browser to download a list of all geographic units (in this case Major Land Resource Areas) for the Ecological Site Descriptions catalog. # Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.# A tab-delimited file will be downloaded. -unit-list.txt Ecological classification An ecological classification is a system of categorizing land areas based on ecological criteria. The ecological site classification system developed by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is one example. The individual units of an ecological classification are referred to as ecological classes. Like geographic data sets, ecological classifications are typically not referenced in web page URLs or web service calls, since each data catalog is always associated with a single ecological classification.


Enter the following URL into a web browser to download a list of all published ecological classes (in this case ecological sites) for the Ecological Site Descriptions catalog. # Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.# A tab-delimited file will be downloaded. -list.txt Geographic unit A geographic unit is a region, sub-region, or other map unit used to give information in EDIT a geographic reference. Nearly all information contributed by EDIT users is ultimately tied to a single geographic unit. This design enables users to quickly narrow the information potentially relevant to their location(s) of interest. Each geographic unit is member to a broader collection of units known as a geographic data set.


Enter the following URL into a web browser to download a list of all published ecological sites for Major Land Resource Area 128X, Southern Appalachian Ridges and Valleys. The geographic unit is specified in the URL by its symbol, "128X". Additional parameters have been included in the call to restrict the list to only those ecological sites associated with mountain slope and ridge landforms AND slopes between 15 and 30%. # Copy and paste this URL into a web browser.# A tab-delimited file will be downloaded. -list.txt?slope=15:30&landform=mountain sloperidge Ecological class An ecological class is a conceptual grouping of land areas based on ecological criteria. Ecological classes are typically used to characterize variation in land potential. As a result, they are often defined using climate, soil, topographic, and other ecological properties that are slow to change. Each ecological class is associated with a single ecological classification. For organizational purposes, each ecological class is also related to a single geographic unit, although it is not uncommon in practice for an ecological class to be represented outside of the geographic unit it is assigned to. 041b061a72


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